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Archive for July, 2009

It was brought to my attention yesterday that a blog for Black Women written by a Black Woman was criticizing interracial advocacy site http://www.whitewomenblackmen.com and of course our blog. Now I’m used to criticism I expected heat when I created this blog, and you all have no idea how much hate mail I receive a week.Usually I dont respond much less make an article about it but I was shocked by the wording the author of the blog site used to describe the act of interracial breeding. She called it “ethnic genocide” really? Ethnic genocide?

Hmmmm, to me this shows how desperate non-white women are getting to “keep their men.” Ethnic Genocide? The holocaust was a genocide, Rwanda, Darfur, Cambodia, Invasion of Native American land those are genocides. Those are ethnic genocides! This just makes me angry because for me it displays pure ignorance. One of history, two of English and three of common sense. Why dont you go down to a child in Darfur and tell him or her that a black man marrying outside his race is “genocide” I’m sure they would love to hear that.

This humble blog may promote white women, interracial relationships, white beauty but I personally have never once condemned people who thought differently than me and I have certainly never used such inappropriate language. Yes, I disagree, I debate I state my case but I never suggested that black men and black women who get married are evil or wrong. As I’ve said many times on this site this is not a hate blog. I dont hate black women, me and my author Kevin might agree or disagree on that topic but even he does not HATE black women. And neither of us would call something as simple as choice “genocide.” Guess what black women and other non-white women there are black men out there who prefer and even honor white women.

But there are plenty of black men who love and honor black women. While I would hope one day interracial relationships of all kinds would be more frequent currently in America that is not that case, and not the case in Africa, or in Europe or in Asia.  So what logic does your statement rely on? None!

I’m sick and fucking tired of black women getting angry when only a relative minority of black men marry outside the race. Are you that insecure? More than likely if you are having trouble getting a man it because there arent a lot of good men in the area or it is you! Sometimes it could be a mix of both. So this so called Genocide, its awful huh? Do you realize that Barack Obama wouldnt even exist had it not been for an “evil white woman” who raised Barack into a great man?

Did you know Fredrick Douglass one of the greatest leaders in African-American history was married to a white woman? Even before it was legal in America. Do you know that due to slavery many African-Americans are mixed race? That due to several things  in American history many African-Americans are not 100% black? I’ll speak more on those topics in future articles the fact of the matter is its not “ethnic genocide” as you so crudely put it, its love. Maybe you have spent so much time in anger you have forgotten what love feels like. Maybe you should step outside your own race and go after a White guy or an Asian guy? So once again this shows me that Black Women and other non-white women are starting to feel the heat, the false stories of the “modern white devil” are starting to wear off. I mean if Iowa, Indiana, Colorado etc. can vote a black man into office I suppose not all white people and thus white women arent that bad huh?

I invite you to a cordial debate on the subject if you are reading this post I invite you to comment back on this. Feel free to state your mind, if you would like to take back your insensitive comment I wont hold it against you, and on another note I feel you have the full right to post your thoughts on your blog even if I feel they are wrong. This is a free country, and in this country I dont consider my father marrying my mother him killing off his ethnicity. I will always embrace the African side of me, hell I even celebrate Kwanza. I know where I stand, do you?

According to Von this is a form of genocide!

According to Von this is a form of genocide!

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Here is another youtube video I made hope ya’ll enjoy it! One funny comment sent to my message box simply answered the video with “No, no questions.” lol


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Recently I was criticized by some for displaying two scantily clad women in an article about white women who were willing to sacrifice their safety and even their lives to participate in the American Civil Rights Movement. The people said it was disrespectful to do so, and I agree. I ashamed of the photo I used for the article, it was very poor judgment. I will repost the article at a later date with a new photo, but I will keep that version up to remind myself that I can not allow that to happen again. These are very REAL stories that deserve respect and dignity.

The following is a heart breaking story about a white woman the world has forgotten, and sadly but not to my suprise buried in the archives and never talked about by the African-American community. It is a story about sadly the only white woman honored at the Montgomery Boycott Memorial. While I must admit it was African-Americans who had to handle most of the heat for the boycott white families suffered as well and for them, why cant they be more honored. Would teaching young African-Americans that some white people were willing to die for them back then really hurt anything? As I said the African-American community in particular the black women have something against white women I believe.

Viola Gregg Liuzzo
Viola Liuzzo (1925-1965) aided protesters during the civil rights movement of the early 1960s in Alabama. She was killed in a Ku Klux Klan attack in 1965 and is the only white woman honored at the Montgomery Civil Rights Memorial.

Viola Liuzzo:
True Kindness assasinated

Viola Fauver was born in Pennsylvania on 11th April, 1925. As a child, Viola lived in Tennessee and Georgia. After an unsuccessful marriage and the birth of two children, Viola married Anthony J. Liuzzo, a Teamster Union official from Detroit. Viola had three more children and at the age of 36 she resumed her education at Wayne State University. After graduating with top honors Viola became a medical lab technician.

A member of the NAACP, Viola decided to take part in the Selma to Montgomery March on 25th March, 1965, where Martin Luther King led 25,000 people to the Alabama State Capitol and handed a petition to Governor George Wallace, demanding voting rights for African Americans. After the demonstration had finished, Viola volunteered to help drive marchers back to Montgomery Airport. Leroy Moton, a young African American, offered to work as her co-driver.

On the way back from one of these trips to the airport, Viola and Leroy, were passed by a car carrying four members of the Ku Klux Klan from Birmingham. When they saw a white woman and black man in the car together, they immediately knew that they had both been taking part in the civil rights demonstration at Montgomery. The men decided to kill them and after driving alongside Viola’s car, one of the men, Collie Wilkins, put his arm out of the window, and fired his gun. Viola Liuzzo was hit in the head twice and died instantly. Leroy was uninjured and was able to get the car under control before it crashed.

The four men in the car, Collie Wilkins (21), Gary Rowe (34), William Eaton (41) and Eugene Thomas (42) were quickly arrested. Rowe, an FBI undercover agent, testifed against the other three men. In an attempt to prejudice the case, rumours began to circulate that Viola was a member of the Communist Party and had abandoned her five children in order to have sexual relationships with African Americans involved in the civil rights movement. It was later discovered that these highly damaging stories that appeared in the press had come from the FBI.

Despite Rowe’s testimony, the three members of the Ku Klux Klan were acquitted of murder by an Alabama jury. President Lyndon Johnson, instructed his officials to arrange for the men to be charged under an 1870 federal law of conspiring to deprive Viola Liuzzo of her civil rights. Wilkins, Eaton and Thomas were found guilty and sentenced to 10 years in prison.

The main stream media can ignore this all they want, but one day the truth shall come out! This woman deserves better than what she got, she is a Civil Rights Hero! Please notify your family and friends about this woman!

Viola Liuzzo (1925-1965) Unsung Hero of Civil Rights Movement

Viola Liuzzo (1925-1965) Unsung Hero of Civil Rights Movement


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Perhaps I should move to the UK. It appears over there hand natural big chested women grow on trees. Not to mention Britain seems to have more respect for their nude models. Well by request we are gonna have a poll showdown over who is the hottest; Keeley Hazell, Lucy Pinder, Sophie Howard, Sammy Braddy, Michelle Marsh or Katie Downes. You vote and decide and of course we have some pictures to help you make your educated decision.

Lucy Pinder

Lucy Pinder

Sophie Howard

Sophie Howard

Michelle Marsh

Michelle Marsh

Sammy Braddy

Sammy Braddy

Katie Downes

Katie Downes

Keeley Hazell

Keeley Hazell

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I’d imagine it would be a lot of fun to take Michelle on a date. Maybe go downtown, to the movies and some up class restaurant. I could imagine all the men who would be sneaking in stares at her in her lovely green dress. Luckily I dont have to imagine what she looks like underneath as my eyes fall out their sockets!

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One of our usual readers “Jen” pointed this article out to me! I’m sohappy for our nation’s capital, here is the article from The Examiner by Jeff Dufour and Kiki Ryan:

Beauty pageant news coverage during the last year has been like never before, thanks largely to the political controversies surrounding former pageant contestants such as soon-to-be former Alaska Gov. Alaska Sarah Palin or former Miss California Carrie Prejean.
But Sunday night’s Miss D.C. pageant lacked that sort of drama. Recent American University graduate Jennifer Corey was crowned Miss D.C. 2009, and her win probably wasn’t a shock to anyone in attendance at the Lincoln Theatre. Before the announcement of the new title-holder, Corey won the top award for outstanding talent, bathing suit competition and evening gown.

The tall, thin blonde will compete for the title of Miss America in January. She has big shoes to fill after last year’s Miss D.C., Kate Marie Grinold (another tall, thin blonde) finished in the top 10.


And although nothing of scandalous proportions occurred to get talking heads to fire back and forth on air, it still had a bit of a political flare. Contestants Sophia Davis and Katie Robertson work on the Hill as staff members for Sen. George Voinovich, R-Ohio, and Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., respectively

She represents the heart of our nation.

She represents the heart of our nation.


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While this article for the St. Petersburg Times was written for Black History Month by a name named Maxwell, with the recent 100 year anniversary of the NAACP I felt that it was only right we didn’t brush over the brave white women of the Civil Rights Movement. Here is the article:

A dear friend telephoned a few days ago and reminded me that I was letting another Black History Month pass without writing about one of the unsung groups of the civil rights movement of the 1960s. My friend is white. Although born financially well off, she has taught journalism at the same traditionally black college in Mississippi since 1972.

I met her during the summer of 1965 in Meadville, Miss., when I was a 19-year-old college student from Texas, and she a 19-year-old college student from Georgia. She was a pretty, petite member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. I was a journalism intern for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Her job was more important than mine, and her life was in much more danger than mine. I merely had to observe, report and write stories and shoot photographs. She put her life on the line.

She was one of thousands of white women who joined the black-led civil rights movement, who came of age during the era of the nation’s greatest social, intellectual and political discontent and renewal. She is right: Hers is an unsung group of freedom fighters. She easily could have suffered the fate of Viola Gregg Luizzo, a mother of five, who traveled from her comfortable home in Michigan to the South to help us. On March 25, 1965, an Alabama Klansman fired a .38-caliber pistol through the window of her car, killing her instantly.

We knew the dangers of working in Meadville. A few months before our arrival, two black men, Henry Dee, 19, and Charles Moore, 20, had been murdered by Klansmen and their bodies dumped in the Mississippi River. Dee had been decapitated, and a piece of wire encircled his torso. Divers found only the lower half of Moore’s body. His ankles were tied with a rope.

Yes, we knew that cops, Klansmen and ordinary racists were especially brutal when white women and black men — suggesting sexual intimacy — were caught together.

My friend lived in a shack with three other women in an all-black, remote section of the county. During the day, she taught in what we called the Freedom School, places where thousands of black children — underserved by the South’s separate-but-equal school system — learned to read and write. During evening hours, she joined other activists in registering illiterate and near-illiterate blacks to vote.

One night, while accompanying her and three black workers to a home where they would help an old black couple complete a Social Security application, I asked her this question: “You’re the daughter of a Southern Baptist preacher. Why’re you risking your life for niggers?”

I remember her answer well (I wrote it in my journal): “Don’t use that word in my presence. Racism is a sin. As a Christian, I’ve got to work — even die — to get rid of this sin.”

“But you’re white.”

“Which makes me even more responsible.”

I swore that night I would write about her and other white women who risked their lives for the cause of civil rights. Alas, I am just now getting around to it — nearly 40 years later.

To make my job easier, my friend sent me a copy of Deep in Our Hearts: Nine White Women in the Freedom Movement. Published in 2000 by the University of Georgia Press, it is a volume that anthologizes the memoirs of Constance Curry, Joan C. Browning, Dorothy Dawson Burlage, Penny Patch, Theresa Del Pozzo, Sue Thrasher, Elaine DeLott Baker, Emmie Schrader Adams, Casey Hayden.

I read it a few days ago, and all of the memories, the fears and the euphoria mostly, returned. I remember the late-night rides on deep-rutted roads through pine forests; steamy wooden churches in the middle of nowhere; white girls curled up under quilts on the floors of cars and the beds of pickups so that redneck cops would not spot them with niggers; black dudes scared they would be blamed if a white cop shoots a white woman; dank and stinking jail cells in towns with very long names; “doing your business” in bushes and behind trees; hastily written picket signs with misspelled words; delicious meals cooked by fat black women wearing feed-sack dresses and colorful aprons.

In their preface, the women list the questions they answer in the memoirs: “These are our stories of the costly times we wouldn’t have missed for the world, and of the people and places and events that filled them. We speak to several questions: Why us? Why did we, of all the white women growing up in our hometowns, cross the color line in the days of segregation and join the Southern Freedom Movement of the sixties? How did we find our way? What happened to us there? How did we leave, and what did we take with us? And, especially, what was it like?”

The thing I admire most about these women, along with those I knew personally, was their selflessness, the devotion to doing right because right is right. I especially respected those like my friend, whose families openly treated African-Americans as inferiors. More than one were disinherited by their parents because of their involvement with the movement.

But these women — mere teenagers — persevered at our side, holding to their heart-deep commitment to social justice. In their special way, they helped this nation at least acknowledge its promise of equality to all citizens. They showed white people that racism not only disfigures its black victims, it also disfigures white people. It turns some whites into grotesque creatures who don sheets and hoods, who burn crosses and murder in the name of God and their race.

Deep in Our Hearts dispels the myth that whites in the civil rights movement were a monolith — rich, East Coast, Ivy League brats with too much time on their hands.

Here is the truth, in the nine women’s own words: “We are all different: Southern and northern; rural and urban; state university and Ivy League; middle class, working class, and poor. We moved to our radical activities in various ways: by Marxism, Christian existentialism, and immigrant folk wisdom; by our grandmothers and the Constitution; by Thoreau and Dumas; by living on a kibbutz; by African freedom fighters; and a Deep South upbringing.”

These nine white women, along with thousands of others, made our country a better place. The movement did not end in these women’s personal lives after they went home for the last time.

Penny Patch speaks for her co-writers, and she speaks for me: “The experience remains at the core of who I am.”

Now some of you may think I’m against the NAACP but I am not. The NAACP is a fantastic organization whom if not for them I could not be sitting here in Chicago typing and honoring the white woman like I am. My problem is there is no Association outside hateful and violent white supremacy groups that are for the advancement of white women.

White women each and every year get pushed to the side for “progress” somehow white women aren’t allowed to come along for the ride even though they helped. Its a shameful silent disgrace that goes on all around the world even in Europe. Perhaps one day we could form the NAAWW The National Association for the Advancement of White Women. But maybe that is too optimistic, it saddens me that despite all white women did (obviously excluding the racist ones) the black community has a growing movement for us to hate white women.Hopefully one day it will change but for now we will just have to do our part to make sure their stories are told.

They gave so much for us and in return we give them hate.

They gave so much for us and in return we give them hate.

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